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Aboriginal Art Regions  Yuendumu

 

Geraldine Napangardi Granites
Title: Ngalyipi Jukurrpa
Price: $300.00 in Australia and Export.
PA822, 2014
Acrylic on canvas
30 x 61 cm
The country associated with this Ngalyipi Jukurrpa (snake vine) is at Yanjirlpiri (Mt. Nicker) to the west of Yuendumu. ‘Ngalyipi’ is a green creeper which curls its tendrils around the trunks and branches of trees and has many uses. Traditionally it was used as a strap to carry ‘parraja’ (wooden food carrying dishes), as a cure for headaches (it was wrapped very tightly around the head), as a rope and as a ceremonial wrap during the ‘witi’ ceremony for the initiation of the sons and grandsons of the Japaljarri and Jungarrayi men. ‘Ngalypi’ was also used to tie ‘witi’ (ceremonial) poles to the legs of the young initiates. The women danced and sang at the ceremony and then had to look away and block their ears when the men danced. The ‘witi’ ceremony happened at night under the stars.
Delivery charge for this item:
Australia $33
North America $77
Europe/Other $77
Asia/Pacific $66
Bess Napanangka Poulson
Title: Ngapa Jukurrpa - Water Dreaming
Price: $300.00 in Australia and Export.
PA801, 2015
Acrylic on canvas
46 x 61 cm
The site depicted is Puyurru, west of Yuendumu. In the usually dry creek beds are ‘mulju’ (soakages), or naturally occurring wells. Two Jangala men, rainmakers, sang the rain, unleashing a giant storm. The storm travelled across the country from the east to the west, initially travelling with a ‘pamapardu Jukurrpa’ (termite Dreaming) from Warntungurru to Warlura, a waterhole 8 miles east of Yuendumu. At Warlura, a gecko called Yumariyumari blew the storm on to Lapurrukurra and Wilpiri. Bolts of lightning shot out at Wirnpa (also called Mardinymardinypa) and at Kanaralji. At this point the Dreaming track also includes the ‘kurdukurdu mangkurdu Jukurrpa’ (children of the clouds Dreaming). The water Dreaming built hills at Ngamangama using baby clouds and also stuck long pointy clouds into the ground at Jukajuka, where they can still be seen today as rock formations. The termite Dreaming eventually continued west to Nyirrpi, a community approximately 160 km west of Yuendumu. The water Dreaming then travelled from the south over Mikanji, a watercourse with soakages northwest of Yuendumu. At Mikanji, the storm was picked up by a ‘kirrkarlanji’ (brown falcon) and taken farther north. At Puyurru, the falcon dug up a giant ‘warnayarra’ (rainbow serpent). The serpent carried water with it to create another large lake, Jillyiumpa, close to an outstation in this country. After stopping at Puyurru, the water Dreaming travelled on through other locations before moving on into Gurindji country to the north. In many paintings of this Dreaming, short dashes are often used to represent ‘mangkurdu’ (clouds), and longer, flowing lines represent ‘ngawarra’ (flood waters). Small circles are used to depict ‘mulju’ (soakages) and river beds.
Quantity 
Delivery charge for this item:
Australia $33
North America $77
Europe/Other $77
Asia/Pacific $66
Bessie Nakamarra Sims
Title: Ngarlajiyi Jukurrpa - Bush Carrot Dreaming
Price: $900.00 in Australia and Export.
PA819, 2009
Acrylic on canvas
61 x 107 cm
Ngarlajiyi is a tiny plant found growing on the side of creeks and in sandy soils and commonly called a bush carrot or small yam. It has a small edible tuber resembling a carrot. The country associated with this Dreaming is Waputarli or Mount Singleton, to the west of Yuendumu. The design of this painting simbolizes the cycle of growth of ‘ngarlajiyi’, telling how after the rain the plant grows quickly and extensively, spreading out over the country. This design is taken from women’s ceremonial body painting. In Warlpiri paintings traditional iconography is used to represent the Jukurrpa, particular sites and other elements. Concentric circles are often used to represent the plants with ‘ngarlajiyi’ fruit, while large concentric circles often represent Yilkirdi, a rockhole in the Waputarli area belonging to the same Dreaming. These large concentric circles can also depict the base of the ‘ngarlajiyi’ plant with its superficial roots extending in the direction of the Dreaming, represented by radiating lines. Clusters depicted in the extreme of these radiating lines usually are portraying the bush carrot ‘jinjila’ (flowers).
Delivery charge for this item:
Australia $33
North America $77
Europe/Other $77
Asia/Pacific $66
Geraldine Napangardi Granites
Title: Ngalyipi Jukurrpa - Snake Vine Dreaming
Price: $300.00 in Australia and Export.
PA816, 2014
Acrylic on canvas
46 x 46 cm
The country associated with this Jukurrpa is at Yanjirlpiri (Mt. Nicker) to the west of Yuendumu. ‘Ngalyipi’ (snake vine) is a green creeper which curls its tendrils around the trunks and branches of trees and has many uses. Traditionally it was used as a strap to carry ‘parraja’ (wooden food carrying dishes), as a cure for headaches (it was wrapped very tightly around the head), as a rope and as a ceremonial wrap during the ‘witi’ ceremony for the initiation of the sons and grandsons of the Japaljarri and Jungarrayi men. ‘Ngalypi’ was also used to tie ‘witi’ (ceremonial) poles to the legs of the young initiates. The women danced and sang at the ceremony and then had to look away and block their ears when the men danced. The ‘witi’ ceremony happened at night under the stars.
Delivery charge for this item:
Australia $33
North America $77
Europe/Other $77
Asia/Pacific $66
Justinna Napaljarri Sims
Title: Star or Seven Sisters Dreaming
Price: $550.00 in Australia and Export.
PA817, 2014
Acrylic on canvas
46 x 91 cm
The Napaljarri-warnu Jukurrpa (seven sisters Dreaming) depicts the story of the seven ancestral Napaljarri sisters who are found in the night sky today in the cluster of seven stars in the constellation Taurus, more commonly known as the Pleiades. The Pleiades are seven women of the Napaljarri skin group and are often depicted in paintings of this Jukurrpa carrying the Jampijinpa man ‘wardilyka’ (the bush turkey) who is in love with the Napaljarri-warnu and who represents the Orion’s Belt cluster of stars. Jukurra-jukurra, the morning star, is a Jakamarra man who is also in love with the seven Napaljarri sisters and is often shown chasing them across the night sky. In a final attempt to escape from the Jakamarra the Napaljarri-warnu turned themselves into fire and ascended to the heavens to become stars. Some parts of the Napaljarri-warnu Jukurrpa are closely associated with men’s sacred ceremonies. Yanjirlpirri Jukurrpa (Star Dreaming) This ceremony tells of the journey of Japaljarri and Jungarrayi men who travelled from Kurlurngalinypa (near Lajamanu) to Yanjirlypirri (west of Yuendumu) and then on to Lake Mackay on the West Australian border. Along the way they performed ‘kurdiji’ (initiation ceremonies) for young men. Women also danced for the ‘kurdiji’. The site depicted in this canvas is Yanjirlypiri (star) where there is a low hill and a water soakage. The importance of this place cannot be overemphasized as young boys are brought here to be initiated from as far as Pitjanjatjara country to the south and Lajamanu to the north.
Delivery charge for this item:
Australia $33
North America $77
Europe/Other $77
Asia/Pacific $66
Biddy Napaljarri White
Title: Watiya-warnu Jukurrpa - Seed Dreaming
Price: $500.00 in Australia and Export.
PA808, 2013
Acrylic on canvas
61 x 61 cm
This painting tells the story of a Jangala ‘watiya-war- nu’ ancestor who travelled south from a small hill called Ngurlupurranyangu to Yamunturrngu (Mount Liebig). As he travelled he picked the ‘watiya-warnu’ seeds and placed them in ‘parrajas’ (food carriers), one of which he carried on his head. Watiya-warnu is a seed bearing tree that grows in open spinifex or mulga country. When people returned to their camp after collecting the seeds they would make large windbreaks for shelter and winnow the seed in the late afternoon. Immature ‘watiya-warnu’ seed is ground into a paste and can be used to treat upset stomachs. The associated ‘watiya-warnu’ ceremony involves the preparation of a large ground painting. In paintings of this Dreaming ‘U’ shapes are often depicting women collecting the ‘watiya-warnu’ seeds. Oval shapes represent the ‘parrajas’ where they carry the seeds and strait lines beside them frequently portrait digging sticks.
Delivery charge for this item:
Australia $33
North America $77
Europe/Other $77
Asia/Pacific $66
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