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Paintings GalleryPaintings from Yuendumu

Gwion

Yuendumu paintings are well known for their bright colours and complex, interwoven patterns. The community lies 280 kilometres north west of Alice Springs along the red, dusty Tanami Track and has approximately 1000 mainly Warlpiri speaking residents.

Brief biographical details of many of the artists are available on the Yuendumu biographies page and more information is available on our page about the Yuendumu Community.

In the descriptions below there are repeated references to "skin names" such as Napaljarri, Nungarrayi, Jupurrula and Jakamarra - for an explanation of these names, see the page on Aboriginal art and society.

The prices below are in Australian dollars and do not include packing, shipping and insurance - use the "Enquire" button to confirm availability of a painting and the cost of shipping. To check the equivalent price in other currencies, use the Currency Conversion link. For more details about shopping, see our Shopping and online security section. All of the paintings below are unstretched.

 

Lola Nampijinpa Brown
Title: Warlukurlangu Jukurrpa - Fire country Dreaming
Price: $1300.00 in Australia and Export.
PA810, 2016
Acrylic on canvas
61 x 152 cm
This Dreaming belongs to Warlukurlangu country to the south-west of Yuendumu. An old man ‘lungkarda’ (centralian blue-tongued lizard), of the Jampijinpa skin group, lived on a hill with his two Jangala sons. The old man would feign blindness and send the two boys hunting in search of meat. While they were gone he would hunt and eat anything that he caught before they returned. One day the sons returned with a kangaroo that they had caught after much tracking. Unfortunately the kangaroo was sacred to the ‘lungkarda’, unbeknown to the boys. In his anger the old man decided to punish his sons and the next time they went out, he put his fire stick to the ground and sent a huge bush fire after them which chased them for many miles, at times propelling them through the air. Although the boys beat out the flames, lungkarda’s special magic kept the fire alive and it re-appeared out of his blue-tongued lizard hole. Exhausted the boys were finally overcome by the flames. Usually sites that are depicted in paintings of this Jukurrpa include Warlukurlangu (a men’s cave), Kirrkirrmanu (where the sacred kangaroo was killed), Wayililinypa (where the fire killed the two Jangala sons) and Marnimarnu (a water soakage) where the two Jangalas camped
Delivery charge for this item:
Australia $33
North America $77
Europe/Other $77
Asia/Pacific $66
Maggie Napaljarri Ross
Title: Mininypa Jukurrpa
Price: $500.00 in Australia and Export.
PA812, 2014
Acrylic on canvas
46 x 76 cm
The Mininypa Jukurrpa (native fuchsia Dreaming) is about a Jungarrayi man called Lintipilinti who lived at Ngarlu, which means ‘red rock’, a country to the east of Yuendumu. Lintipilinti fell in love with a Napangardi woman, a forbidden relationship under Warlpiri law, as the woman was his classificatory mother-in-law. Lintipilinti fell in love with the Napangardi woman when he saw the large hole in the ground she made when she urinated. Lintipilinti was aroused by this. He began to wonder how he could woo the Napangardi. He went to Ngarlu and made hair string for her, singing as he worked. The Napangardi woman could not sleep and began to feel sick. She realized that someone was singing Yilpinji (love songs) for her. A little bird visited the Napangardi woman every day. The little bird was taking the Jungarrayi’s love songs to her. The force of the Jungarrayi’s love songs pulled the Napangardi woman to Lintipilinti. When the two met again they made love but they were turned to stone, as their relationship was taboo according to Warlpiri religious law. The two can still be seen, as two rocks at Ngarlu today. During the course of these events the women from Ngarlu who gossiped about the wrong skin love union turned into ‘miinypa’. These are plants are also called ‘yanyirlingi’. They have small red flowers with honey inside them which are delicious to eat, tasting like ice-cream. Ngarlu is a sacred place where ‘miinypa’ are still commonly found today.
Delivery charge for this item:
Australia $33
North America $77
Europe/Other $77
Asia/Pacific $66
Julie Nangala Robertson
Title: Ngapa Jukurrpa - Water Dreaming
Price: $450.00 in Australia and Export.
PA802, 2015
Acrylic on canvas
46 x 46 cm
The site depicted is Pirlinyarnu (Mt. Farewell), about 165 km west of Yuendumu in the Northern Territory. Two Jangala men, rainmakers, sang the rain, unleashing a giant storm that collided with another storm from Wapurtali at Mirawarri. A ‘kirrkarlanji’ (brown falcon) carried the storm further west from Mirawarri. The two storms travelled across the country from Karlipirnpa, a ceremonial site for the water Dreaming near Kintore. Along the way the storms passed through Juntiparnta. The storm eventually became too heavy for the falcon. It dropped the water at Pirlinyarnu, where it formed an enormous ‘maluri’ (claypan). A ‘mulju’ (soakage) exists in this place today. Whenever it rains today, hundreds of ‘ngapangarlpa’ (bush ducks) still flock to Pirlinyarnu. In many paintings of this Dreaming, short dashes are often used to represent ‘mangkurdu’ (clouds), and longer, flowing lines represent ‘ngawarra’ (flood waters). Small circles are used to depict ‘mulju’ (soakages) and river beds.
Delivery charge for this item:
Australia $33
North America $77
Europe/Other $77
Asia/Pacific $66
Shorty Jangala Robertson
Title: Ngapa Jukurrpa - Water Dreaming
Price: $2950.00 in Australia and Export.
PA809, 2010
Acrylic on canvas
91 x 107 cm
The site depicted is Puyurru, west of Yuendumu. In the usually dry creek beds are water soakages or naturally occurring wells. Two Jangala men, rainmakers, sang the rain, unleashing a giant storm. It travelled across the country, with the lightning striking the land. This storm met up with another storm from Wapurtali, to the west, was picked up by a ‘kirrkarlan’ (brown falcon) and carried further west until it dropped the storm at Purlungyanu, where it created a giant soakage. At Puyurru the bird dug up a giant snake, ‘warnayarra’ (the ‘rainbow serpent’) and the snake carried water to create the large lake, Jillyiumpa, close to an outstation in this country. In many paintings of this Jukurrpa curved and straight lines represent the ‘ngawarra’ (flood waters) running through the landscape. Motifs frequently used to depict this story include small circles representing ‘mulju’ (water soakages) and short bars depicting ‘mangkurdu’ (clouds).
Delivery charge for this item:
Australia $33
North America $77
Europe/Other $77
Asia/Pacific $66
Gayle Napangardi Gibson
Title: Mina Mina Jukurrpa
Price: $750.00 in Australia and Export.
PA821, 2015
Acrylic on canvas
61 x 91 cm
This ‘Jukurrpa’ (Dreaming) comes from Mina Mina, a very important women’s Dreaming site far to the west of Yuendumu near Lake Mackay and the WA border. There are a number of ‘mulju’ (water soakages) and a ‘maluri’ (clay pan) at Mina Mina. In the Dreamtime, ancestral women danced at Mina Mina and ‘karlangu’ (digging sticks) rose up out of the ground. The women collected the digging sticks and then travelled on to the east, dancing, digging for bush tucker, collecting ‘ngalyipi’ (snake vine), and creating many places as they went. ‘Ngalyipi’ is a rope-like creeper that grows up the trunks and limbs of trees, including ‘kurrkara’ (desert oak). It is used as a ceremonial wrap and as a strap to carry ‘parraja’ (coolamons) and ‘ngami’ (water carriers). ‘Ngalyipi’ is also used to tie around the forehead to cure headaches, and to bind cuts. The women stopped at Karntakurlangu, Janyinki, Parapurnta, Kimayi, and Munyuparntiparnti, sites spanning from the west to the east of Yuendumu. When they stopped, the women dug for bush foods like ‘jintiparnta’ (desert truffle). The Dreaming track eventually took them far beyond Warlpiri country. In many paintings of this Jukurrpa, sinuous lines are used to represent the ‘ngalyipi’ (snake vine). Concentric circles are often used to represent the ‘jintiparnta’ (desert truffles) that the women have collected, while straight lines can be used to depict the ‘karlangu’ (digging sticks).
Delivery charge for this item:
Australia $33
North America $77
Europe/Other $77
Asia/Pacific $66
Lucky Nampijinpa Langdon
Title: Watiya-warnu Jukurrpa - Seed Dreaming
Price: $300.00 in Australia and Export.
PA824, 2015
Acrylic on canvas
46 x 46 cm
This painting tells the story of a Jangala ‘watiya-warnu’ ancestor who travelled south from a small hill called Ngurlupurranyangu to Yamunturrngu (Mount Liebig). As he travelled he picked the ‘watiya-warnu’ seeds and placed them in ‘parrajas’ (food carriers), one of which he carried on his head. Watiya-warnu is a seed bearing tree that grows in open spinifex or mulga country. When people returned to their camp after collecting the seeds they would make large windbreaks for shelter and winnow the seed in the late afternoon. Immature ‘watiya-warnu’ seed is ground into a paste and can be used to treat upset stomachs. The associated ‘watiya-warnu’ ceremony involves the preparation of a large ground painting. In paintings of this Dreaming ‘U’ shapes are often depicting women collecting the ‘watiya-warnu’ seeds. Oval shapes represent the ‘parrajas’ where they carry the seeds and strait lines beside them frequently portrait digging sticks.
Delivery charge for this item:
Australia $33
North America $77
Europe/Other $77
Asia/Pacific $66
Alma Nungarrayi Granites
Title: Yanjirlpirri or Napaljarri-Warnu Jukurrpa
Price: $1000.00 in Australia and Export.
PA827, 2015
Acrylic on canvas
61 x 76 cm
The Napaljarri-Warnu Jukurrpa (Seven Sisters Dreaming) depicts the story of the seven ancestral Napaljarri sisters who are found in the night sky today in the cluster of seven stars in the constellation Taurus, more commonly known as the Pleiades. The Pleiades are seven women of the Napaljarri skin group and are often depicted in paintings of this Jukurrpa carrying the Jampijinpa man ‘wardilyka’ (the bush turkey) who is in love with the Napaljarri-warnu and who represents the Orion’s Belt cluster of stars. Jukurra-jukurra, the morning star, is a Jakamarra man who is also in love with the seven Napaljarri sisters and is often shown chasing them across the night sky. In a final attempt to escape from the Jakamarra the Napaljarri-warnu turned themselves into fire and ascended to the heavens to become stars. Yanjirlpirri Jukurrpa (Star Dreaming) tells of the journey of Japaljarri and Jungarrayi men who travelled from Kurlurngalinypa (near Lajamanu) to Yanjirlypirri (west of Yuendumu) and then on to Lake Mackay on the West Australian border. Along the way they performed ‘kurdiji’ (initiation ceremonies) for young men. Women also danced for the ‘kurdiji’. The site depicted in this canvas is Yanjirlypiri (star) where there is a low hill and a water soakage. The importance of this place cannot be overemphasized as young boys are brought here to be initiated from as far as Pitjanjatjara country to the south and Lajamanu to the north.
Delivery charge for this item:
Australia $33
North America $77
Europe/Other $77
Asia/Pacific $66
Agnes Nampijinpa Fry
Title: Yankirri Tjukurrpa
Price: $450.00 in Australia and Export.
PA829, 2015
Acrylic on canvas
46 x 76 cm
This particular site of the Yankirri Jukurrpa (emu Dreaming) is at Ngarlikurlangu, north of Yuendumu. The ‘yankirri’ travelled to the rockhole at Ngarlikurlangu to find water. Emus are usually represented by their ‘wirliya’ (footprints), arrow-like shapes that show them walking around Ngarlikurlangu eating ‘yakajirri’ (bush raisin). In the time of the Jukurrpa there was a fight at Ngarlikiurlangu between a ‘yankirri’ ancestor and Wardilyka (Australian bustard) ancestors over sharing the ‘yakajirri’. There is also a dance for this Jukurrpa that is performed during initiation ceremonies.
Delivery charge for this item:
Australia $33
North America $77
Europe/Other $77
Asia/Pacific $66
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